Graduate Courses

Schedule

If you are not an SPPH student but wish to register in one of courses, please see the Visiting Students page for instructions.

Courses

NOTE: Syllabi for all courses are updated as we receive them from the instructors. Please refer to past syllabi for content reference, but understand that room location and times (for example), may be subject to change. If you do not see a course syllabus here, please contact the course instructor directly for more information.

Not all courses listed here are offered every year. Please visit our online schedules (links provided at the top of this page) to see which courses are currently being offered.

SPHA courses offered in the Master of Health Administration program are restricted for MHA students and are listed separately.


Planned collection, numeric and graphic summarization, and elementary statistical analysis of data. Examples primarily from health sciences illustrate standard techniques for parametric and non-parametric hypothesis testing; regression and correlation; contingency tables. Also randomization, "blindfolding" and other specifically biomedical topics in statistics. Class size may be limited.

Please note this is a Graduate level course.

Prerequisite
Ability to use high school Algebra and simple graphs.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1
Distributed Learning: Term 1


Basic epidemiological designs as a framework for commonly used biostatistical techniques such as the Mantel-Haenszel, chi-squared, linear and logistic regression, and survival analysis. Computer packages will be available for computation of assignments.

Prerequisite
Either (a) all of HCEP 400, HCEP 502 or (b) all of SPPH 400, SPPH 502 or (c) all of SPPH 567, SPPH 502.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2
Distributed Learning: Term 2

To explore and compare methods of analyzing continuous and categorical longitudinal data. The issues of missing data and errors in measurement/misclassification will be covered in depth. The material will be taught by reading and discussing a selection of papers and by analyzing data sets using different techniques and comparing the results.

Prerequisite
Either (a) all of HCEP 400, HCEP 500, HCEP 502 or (b) all of SPPH 400, SPPH 500, SPPH 502 or (c) all of SPPH 500, SPPH 502, SPPH 567

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Sources and uses of epidemiologic data for health services planning and administration including methods of data collection and study design.

Prerequisite:
Enrolment in a Health Care and Epidemiology graduate program, or permission of instructor.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1
Distributed Learning: Term 1

Critical thinking in epidemiology; principles and methods of study design; context for epidemiological investigations of human health.

Prerequisite:
Either (a) all of HCEP 400, HCEP 502 or (b) all of SPPH 400, SPPH 502.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2
Distributed Learning: Term 1

This second level course will teach research trainees to apply methods taught in prior courses towards the development of a fundable research protocol and the analysis and interpretation of real epidemiologic data.

Prerequisite: Either (a) all of HCEP 400, HCEP 500, HCEP 502, or (b) all of SPPH 400, SPPH 500, SPPH 502, and one of the following: SPPH 503, SPPH 506, SPPH 519 or SPPH 530.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

The course will provide a framework for students to use epidemiological and other scientific evidence to make decisions about causation and to recommend policy actions.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Major quantitative research designs, measurement reliability and validity, common data sources used, internal and external validity, research proposals, and peer review.
Credit will be granted for only one of SPPH 506 or SPPH 548.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

SPPH 507 in conjunction with SPPH 607 is a required course for students in the MSc program. Students present and discuss their research and other topics of interest.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Term 1

Includes a significant component of applied epidemiology and biostatistics in a field setting.

Prerequisite
SPPH 400, SPPH 502, SPPH 524, SPPH 525.

Human genetics and genomics, behavioural, social, and environmental factors in modifying or influencing genetics in the manifestation of disease.

Prerequisite
SPPH 502.


Concepts and techniques of measurement in epidemiological research. Topics covered include validity, reliability and misclassification, scale design and the construction of questionnaires and indices for both health outcomes and exposures.

Prerequisite
Either (a) HCEP 400 or (b) SPPH 400.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Collection and analysis of epidemiological data on cancer; genetic, occupational and other risk factors; analytic techniques; cancer control, prevention, screening, early detection and policy issues.

Prerequisite
SPPH 502 or equivalent.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Ethical considerations, intention-to-treat versus efficacy trials, principles of sampling and exclusion, methods of allocation and techniques of randomization, parallel versus cross over design, monitoring treatment outcomes, adverse effects, stopping rules, analytic techniques and data interpretation, and logistical issues in the management of clinical trials.

Prerequisite
Either (a) one of HCEP 502, HCEP 513 or (b) one of SPPH 502, SPPH 513

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Principles and methods of epidemiology are applied to clinical problems. Evaluation and design of laboratory and clinical tests and of therapeutic interventions.

Prerequisite
Either (a) one of HCEP 400, HCEP 502 or (b) one of SPPH 400, SPPH 502.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Methods and application of decision analysis to improve health from the perspective of the policy maker, health professional, and patient.

Prerequisite
Either (a) all of HCEP 400, HCEP 502 or (b) all of SPPH 400, SPPH 502.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

This course provides students with a strong foundation in the theory of public health surveillance, covering both infectious and chronic diseases. Students get practical experience through the analysis of surveillance data and planning of a surveillance program.

Prerequisite
Either (a) all of HCEP 400, HCEP 502 or (b) all of SPPH 400, SPPH 502.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

The course focuses on systematic review methodology so that students will develop an understanding of the key components of a review and acquire the key skills needed to carry out their own reviews.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Clinical Research Methods for Surgical Procedures

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Application of mathematical models in understanding communicable disease dynamics and control; interpretation of model outcomes; modeling methods and their applications.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Purposes, context, procedures, and relationships within qualitative health research and methodologies.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2



Epidemiology of viral, bacterial and parasitic infections with emphasis on the control of these infections in human populations. Immunization programs will be stressed.

Prerequisite
Either (a) all of HCEP 400, HCEP 502 or (b) all of SPPH 400, SPPH 502.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2
Distributed Learning: Term 2

This course is now listed as SPPH 621.

Role of air, water, food, and solid waste as sources of human health risks; global environmental health issues; sustainability.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional - Term 2
Distributed Learning - Term 2

 

Global threats to human health stemming from conflict, poverty, and environmental degradation.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Cell biology, microbiology, molecular science, genetics, physiology, and evolution.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1
Distributed Learning: Term 1

History of public health research and practice; occupational and environmental health; health services and systems; social and lifecourse determinants of health; and population health and emerging trends.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1
Distributed Learning: Term 1

Leadership skills; use of information technologies in leadership; evidence-informed decision-making; policy development; and knowledge exchange and translation.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2
Distributed Learning: Term 1

Foundational thinking giving rise to the concept of population health. Overview of the current state of research.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Issues and solutions to delivery of health services to underserved rural populations.

Prerequisite
SPPH 400, 502

Corequisite
SPPH 500

Required for all MHSc students.


Design and analysis of etiologic research in occupational health.

Prerequisite
Prerequisite: SPPH 502 or Permission of the Instructor

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Theory, concepts, measurement, and practical skills using administrative data for analysis of health care systems.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Environmental Health Risk Assessment and Communication

Term Offered and Syllabus

Mechanism of action of commonly encountered occupational toxic agents; relevance of laboratory and epidemiological evidence.

Prerequisite
Permission of instructor.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Occupational diseases; research, historical perspectives, and surveillance
Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Scientific basis for the recognition, evaluation, and control of chemical, physical, and biological exposures; standard setting; exposure monitoring methods.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Experience of colonization; Indian Act; the histories and intergenerational impact of the residential school; child-welfare systems; communicable disease prevention; the challenge of ethical public health practice; and traditional healing.

Term Offered and Syllabus

This course is offered in Distributed Learning (DL) only.
Term 2

Indicators of maternal/newborn well-being across population subgroups, changing trends in obstetrical intervention, perinatal morbidity, and the analysis of perinatal data.

Prerequisites: SPPH 400, SPPH 502 Corequisite: SPPH 500.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

This course will review ethical discussions, principles and frameworks in relation to ethical issues that arise in population and public health. Ethical theory can help articulate the complexities of ethical issues and structure reasoning around the best responses. But there is no agreement about what ethical theory is the correct one, and different ethical theories emphasize different approaches to ethical concerns.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Summer Session 2017

Biology of aging, epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, neoplasms, osteoporosis and fractures, psychosocial factors and health in old age, dementias, functional status, and prevention of disease.

Prerequisites: SPPH 502, SPPH 524

Term Offered and Syllabus


Examines the concept of evaluation in health services and how various methodological approaches can be used in evaluative studies.

Prerequisite
Either (a) all of HCEP 400, HCEP 502 or (b) all of SPPH 400, SPPH 502.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Economic evaluation of health service interventions and programs, with emphasis on methods and components of program costing.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional : Term 2

Analysis of the evolution and structure of the Canadian health care system.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

This course is an advanced program evaluation course.

Prerequisite
Either (a) HCEP 502 or (b) SPPH 502.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Syllabus

The social determinants of health have profound impacts on inequities across the life course, as do population-level interventions. Builds on SPPH 527, with an emphasis on life course perspectives and vulnerable populations.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Practice and community-based (participatory) research related to health promotion, including its historical and philosophical roots. Application of social and behavioural theories to participatory research and the planning, implementation, and evaluation of community health promotion initiatives.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Distributed Learning: Term 1

Resource allocation, economics and ethics based approaches for decision-making, uptake of evidence to inform resource use in health care.

Term Offered and Syllabus

Traditional: Term 2
Distributed Learning: Term 2

This course is now listed as SPPH 506


Critical examination of strategies regarding addictive behaviours, substance use and related problems, in the context of a multidisciplinary approach.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Students will be introduced to general aspects of science communication as well as the theory and practice of risk communication in public health. The ultimate goal of the course is to provide students with practical experience in crafting clear, concise, and appropriate public health messages for a range of audiences, and specific course objectives include: improve practical communication skills, including writing and visual communication; understand the Hazard vs. Outrage framework for risk communication, identify which quadrant best describes the audience for a given exercise in communication, and select and use the right tools to reach each type of audience; and, through case studies, analyze real-world examples of successful and unsuccessful public health risk communication

Term Offered and Syllabus
Syllabus

Severe addiction and mental illness and the systemic context in which they occur.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Distributed Learning: Summer

Injury epidemiology; surveillance; development, implementation, and evaluation techniques of preventive strategies; determinants of health; social marketing; injury policy; evidence-based prevention strategies; utilization of injury datasets.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Distributed Learning: Term 1

Required for Master of Health Administration (MHA) non-thesis program.


Industrial hygiene and environmental exposure monitoring, methods, and instrumentation, and theory. Laboratories demonstrate workplace sampling and analysis techniques.

Prerequisite
SPPH 535

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Industrial ventilation, heating and air conditioning systems, respiratory protection, chemical protective clothing.

Prerequisite
SPPH 535.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Human factors in workplace design, anthropometry, work physiology. This course applies knowledge about human capabilities to the design of work, including workspace design, work methods, work organization. Topics include systems design and task analysis, anthropometry and workspace design, upper-limb musculoskeletal injuries and back injuries, shift-work, skilled work and mental activity, psychosocial and organizational aspects of work and ergonomics regulations and standards.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Application of occupational hygiene principles using field investigations, critical appraisal of results, and communication with labour and management.

Prerequisite
SPPH 562

Corequisite
SPPH 563.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Determinants of exposure, sampling strategies.

Prerequisite
Introductory statistics.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2

Safety management; systems analysis; accident investigation; collection of accident data; fault trees; total loss control.

Term Offered and Syllabus

Health issues associated with health and the built environment; design of urban form for non-motorized transportation for the improvement of personal and environmental health; factors that impact transportation choices; applying findings from research to specific transportation planning processes and projects.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1


SPPH 580 (3/6) Directed Studies

SPPH 580P (3) Bayesian biostatistics

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2 (every other year)


Data analysis and visualization are necessary skills for anyone working in population and public health. The R statistical computing environment is rapidly becoming the platform of choice for these activities in many scientific disciplines. Unlike other environments such as SPLUS or SAS, R is open-source and multi-platform, making it the ideal tool for trainees. Students should expect to finish this course feeling confident in their ability to tackle any problem in R, and in their ability to learn new software if/when necessary.

Co-requisite or pre-requisite SPPH 400 or pre-requisite SPPH 500

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

This course is intended to provide students with the latest information about the major causes of illness and death in low- and middle-income countries with an emphasis on the least developed. This fascinating examination of the state of the world's health covers HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, neglected tropical diseases, malnutrition, motor vehicle accidents, non-communicable diseases, alcohol use and tobacco control, neonatal and maternal conditions, climate change, mental health, occupational risks and much more. Guest lecturers and experienced practitioners will help students gain a solid understanding of the basic science, epidemiology, clinical management and public health approach to the world's most important conditions, as well as their political, ethical, economic and social dimensions. If you want 'to save the world', you'll need to know 'from what'?

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

This is a foundational course for those entering the global health stream. Within the context of least developed countries or resource constrained populations this course will address burden of disease estimates, key indicators and principal determinants of health, global intervention strategies, public, NGO and private sector players in global health and their performance.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the important practical skills and key competencies that are required to be successful working in the field of global health.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Distributed Learning: Term 2

This advanced course provides students with a unique opportunity to learn in depth about critical controversies and current research trends in early child development, from interdisciplinary, applied, cross-cultural, and ecological perspectives.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Syllabus

This course will serve as an introduction to the fundamental concepts of nutrition with particular emphasis to pediatric populations.

Term Offered and Course Outline
Traditional: Term 2

In SPPH581(S), students will be introduced to the theory and practice of risk communication in public health (weeks 1-8), as well as general aspects of communication, including clarity in communication, how to work with the media, and emerging digital platforms (weeks 9-13). The ultimate goal of the course is to provide students with practical experience in crafting clear, concise, and appropriate public health messages, and specific course objectives include:

  • Understand the Hazard vs. Outrage framework for risk communication, identify which quadrant best describes the audience for a given exercise in communication, and select and use the right tools to reach each type of audience.
  • Describe new opportunities for public health risk communication and challenges facing the field, including effective cross-cultural communication and working with challenging audiences.
  • Through case studies drawn from occupational health, environmental health, and communicable and chronic disease, analyze real-world examples of successful and unsuccessful public health risk communication.
  • Improve practical communication skills, including writing and visual communication.
  • Understand how the media sources and tells public health stories, and understand how to work with the media to get your message across clearly.

Term Offered and Course Outline
Traditional: Term 2

Since the early 1990s, Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) has emerged as a highly influential movement that has impacted almost all health related disciplines, including population and public health. At the core of EBM is a set of beliefs about what constitutes good evidence for the effectiveness of health interventions. Consequently, it is an excellent example of what some philosophers refer to as a coupled ethical-epistemic issue. That is, what makes something good evidence for the effectiveness of a health intervention is not only a scientific or statistical question, but is also linked to the deeply value-laden aim of improving health in both clinical and population settings. This course, then, focuses on coupled ethical-epistemic issues arising from EBM, and their implications for population and public health. Specific topics to be addressed include:

  • Ethical and value aspects of the concept of evidence.
  • Potential rationales and shortcomings of evidence hierarchies commonly used in EBM.
  • The role of evidence-based approaches in population health, wherein randomized clinical trials are often infeasible.
  • Susceptibility of EBM to sponsorship bias and disease mongering, and approaches for countering these.

Term Offered and Course Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

This course is intended to provide students with an understanding and substantive knowledge of the epidemiology and burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and their determinants in Canada and globally, introduce students to population-based NCD models and teach the principles of developing and implementing policies and programs for the prevention of NCDs

Term Offered and Course Syllabus
Traditional: Term 2


Applied project on approved topic based on practicum: requires a written and oral report.


Required course in PhD program. Topics of current interest will be presented and discussed by students and various faculty.
Term Offered and Syllabus
Term 1

Formerly SPPH 521. Research approaches in the area of population and public health; focus on developing research questions and the centrality of research questions in conducting research.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

The purpose of the course is to develop competency in applying causal inference methodology to observational data.

The course links concepts and practical skills for making causal inference in epidemiology, health services research, and studies in occupational and environmental health. The course formally defines concepts of causality and causal effect, and explicates conditions for attributing observed associations to causal relationship. Then, the course offers learning of causal methodology through practical applications to real data.

Learning from the course, students will be able to produce causal diagrams for thesis projects, to refine research questions, to identify variables for adjustment, to detail the plan of analysis, and to estimate direct and indirect treatment effects with data from their own projects.

The course will benefit those who analyze data from patient registries, administrative records, hospital discharges, or from study cohorts.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1
Schedule: Term 1

The course will explore the role of epidemiologic methods in medical research and the role of such research in supporting the knowledge-based practice of clinical and community medicine.

Term Offered and Syllabus
Traditional: Term 1

SPPH 699: Doctoral Dissertation (0)


SPPH 570 (3) / SPPH 710 (0): Current Issues in Public Health Practice